Friday, October 26, 2012

Multimedia Resumes?

One of the culminating experiences for our degree program is the Professional Portfolio. From what I hear it is a quarter long class that helps the students prepare an online resume and portfolio of the projects accomplished during our degree track. A portfolio is a little more than a resume, but the concept does take us in the right direction. Participating in online education provides us with greater knowledge and skill when it comes to multimedia tools and communication. These do not translate very well to a text resume. Wouldn't it be great, instead of listing "redesigned website", to put a live link to the website?

I remembered that the Online MLIS discussion board from last year had a great thread about the portfolio project and included some links to ther students' sites and librarians' sites. John George gave this example. Tracy's site is visually interesting and organized with her social media networks prominently displayed.

This example came from a blog post the author wrote about creating multimedia resumes. Justin's resume is formatted like a traditional resume but with much more information that could possibly fit in 2 pages. He also includes important YouTube videos and links to professional blogs that are critical to his experiences and accomplishments.

I enjoy the resumes with links and a few embedded videos, but I really disliked the ones I saw with "interactive" videos. The first resume I viewed before writing this post I found through an article at www.msnbc.com. The resume felt over-produced and a little unnecessary. His answers to the questions felt canned and incredibly vague. I suppose it is divergence from the typical cover letter, and maybe experience will change my mind on that matter, but tonight

I am not sure if multimedia resumes are replacing traditional print, but they do provide a great supplement. This article from a few years ago mentions that these kinds of resumes are "great for networking" much like Linkedin. A colleague explained to me that multimedia resumes don't get considered until that candidate is in the final pool. Especially in jobs with hundreds of applicants, employers typically spend less than 20 seconds looking at a resume and cover letter.

Final thought: Multimedia resumes and portfolios are becoming more and more useful in this multimedia online environment, but you should still have a deftly edited single page traditional resume as backup.

There are a few websites and services out there that for multimedia resumes including http://firstdialog.com/home and http://www.visualcv.com/. I'll consider comparing those services in a future blog post.

8 comments:

  1. Thank you for a great post. "Multimedia resume" is something I've heard in a few places, but I didn't have a great idea of what they were. I'd imagine that, like anything, the applicability of such resume would vary widely based on the level of employment and the field.

    The examples you gave are very interesting...I'm in the professional portfolio course now and might steal a few ideas to punch up my draft portfolio. I've also been looking for an excuse to give Prezi a shot, that might be a summer project.

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    1. Good luck on your Portfolio, Cherise! I agree with you about the "applicability" - I could see this getting thrown out, so to speak, at a more traditional company. Use MMResumes wisely...

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  3. Nice job Sarah of providing examples of multimedia resumes. I know I need to start working on my own for when it comes time to start job hunting, but it still seems intimidating.

    I agree with you that Ryan's resumes is over produced. As someone who hires people I would look at that and say that he wouldn't be good at taking advice/constructive criticism from a boss or co-worker because he is overly confident in his abilities.
    -Kristen

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    1. My first thought about that video was about how having a video like that may influence his chances - in a bad way. Just how we are generally discouraged from including photos with our resumes, isn't that the same?

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  4. Thanks for sharing, Sarah. Multimedia resume is a good for some people and business. A good example is that one of my friends created his own website using advanced technique, he showed it as his resume to some good network companies, and got many offers at last. However, it is not for all business and industry.

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  5. Interesting discussion. I must say, I find the idea of multimedia resumes intimidating. Perhaps it's because I'm essentially a text communicator; I write and edit professionally, and have been communicating with friends online for many years in text only, before video or even pictures became an integral part of the online experience. It's a mode I find very comfortable and natural, although I realize I'm probably in the minority. Still, I think it's still important to a lot of professions to be able to express oneself verbally, and for those a written resume is good proof that you can. For others, perhaps the multimedia approach would be effective, especially as a second-round alternative to something like a phone interview - I think the concerns about hirers' time constraints are well-taken too. Still, it's an important part of the modern job-seeker's toolkit to know how to use one if a situation calls for it, so thanks!

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    1. Thanks for the response, Marty. I never thought about it as a second round submission (Nice to talk to you, also, here is this video!) But I can see how that would be more effective than providing it in the initial round.

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